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Beginner Singing
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TOPIC: Beginner Singing

Beginner Singing 6 years, 9 months ago #599

Hello TVJim

Singing....where to start... what would your advise be.

What song(s) would you consider a good for a beginner to start with,
that you would consider as a useful tool to you as an instructor giving a first appraisal ?

Should a beginner start singing with music or without music?

Thanks

Dermot
Last Edit: 6 years, 9 months ago by thereshopeyet.

Re: Beginner Singing 6 years, 8 months ago #606

  • TVJim
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I always like to point out the fact that every new song you sing is like a new crossword puzzle and that you have to solve all the problems in it.

The first thing that needs to be done is to vocalize to vocal exercises to create some flexibility and balance in the voice. No matter what song you sing if those problems are not solved the song won't be up to par.

So it is my suggestion that you go through the beginning and intermediate course information on a very regular basis. There are many places on the site where I explain the fact that we have 2 tendons in our vocal cords and those tendons must be stretched for your voice to gain flexibility.

They cannot be stretched during normal speech but only through utilizing the types of exercises that I've included in the courses.

This is something that most beginners really don't understand and that is
getting the flexibility in the vocal cords and getting the right amount of air pressure up underneath the vocal cords as you vocalize will have a cause and effects throughout everything that you sing.

What I always do with a new student when I walk into my studio is at 1st just play some random notes on the piano and ask the student to sing them just to find out if they can even match their pitch to the notes.

It doesn't really matter if they can or can not find the note . If they're having trouble finding the note I'll have them sing a note and I'll find their note this is all about evaluation.

I moved right from there to having them vocalize on a 5 note major scale pattern. Meaning the first 5 notes of the scale major scale (12345 or do re mi fa so).

I always have them vocalize on the Ah vowel sound not because I feel that's the best sound for them to advance their voice and exercises with but because that's actually a harder sound to sing correctly.

Actually I never ever train anybody on a Ah vowel sound in the beginning exercises . I only use it for evaluation.

Now of course you're not here in my studio for me to do that with that is why I have put the exercises down in such a logical manner that regardless of what the evaluation turns out to be if you follow the exercises in chronological order your voice will start to improve.

At 1st you may not notice anything and everybody's very judgmental about their own voices in what they expect to happen quickly. That is another point I want to make please do not be judgmental of your voice in the beginning just believe that you will be getting better as you vocalize and continue to enjoy the process. It will get better, I'm saying it again for a fact it will get better.

So it takes a little patience and Tenacity to do these exercises as it does any other set of exercises for any other reason to improve the strength of your body.

Everybody knows if they do enough setups push-ups curls that there will be a cause-and-effect and they'll see it in their body. But not the 1st day of course. Vocal exercises of the same.

Also these exercises are physical and like any physical exercises it takes time.

Also, the extra added thing is the ear training and air balancing that is also required of a vocalist. I'm saying that the physical and the thought mind connection must be brought together in a logical way. Again thought out in the exercises.

As far as singing with or without music my answer is to do both. A cappella singing without having to match up to the pitch of the chord changes is of benefit. Singing the chord changes and getting your voice to match the correct melody line within the chord changes is also of extreme benefit.


As far as songs are concerned I always like to get a beginning singer to sing a song that is very easy, meaning not too challenging in the range, not too challenging in the notes moving too fast, not too challenging in notes jumping up and down in wide intervals.

This doesn't mean you have to sing Mary had a Little Lamb but just songs that you're feeling pretty comfortable with, in the beginning it's more important to work a little bit more on preciseness than the extremes that everybody wants to be able to handle in the harder songs.

Also, the way I've structured things on the site all the exercises in the courses can be parts to be related to when you're actually learning a song.

When I do song breakdowns I always include exercises to help you get your voice in the proper position for that particular song and also discuss the vowel consonant and pronunciation concepts of the lyrics.All of these exercises can be found in the courses.

Also song choices are very different for the Male and female voice because of where their range fall’s.

If you were to choose Beatles songs you'd actually be better off to choose songs that Ringo and George sang over the songs that John and Paul were singing. Obviously John and Paul were much more advanced singers.

Don't get me wrong George had the same some really weird harmony parts and had to have an amazing ear to do that when he was singing harmony in the group.

But his solo material and Ringo's solo material are flat-out easier in range and technique.

Also learning some of the older ballad singers (even if it may seem boring and not your style) at all are still great learning tools.

So even Frank Sinatra songs Dean Martin and Tony Bennett could be of great value to you. Most of those singers I just mentioned never go into their head voice at all but stay in chest to mix.

Much different than trying to sing Eagles tunes in the beginning because they really sang from chest mix and head voice constantly.

Same holds true for heavier rockers like Led Zeppelin tunes the technique has to be stronger before we move into songs like.

It's kind of interesting but it's almost like the history of American singing progresses through the decades from an easier approach to a harder approach.

Meaning it's easier to sing 30s and 40s ballads even 50s

than is the singing 60s 70s 80s and on up till today because in those time periods the singers sang higher into their head voices.

Definitely there are some songs in the 50s that fall right in line with the Sinatra era as well. Although even in the 50s you'll find a lot more use of head voice.

Probably more information than you expected but just to give you a little overview to help you on your journey.

Keep singing,
TV Jim

Re: Beginner Singing 6 years, 8 months ago #607

Hello TVJim

Thanks for taking the time to explain.
It's interesting information and plenty of food for thought.

Thanks again

Dermot
Last Edit: 6 years, 8 months ago by thereshopeyet.

Re: Beginner Singing 4 months, 4 weeks ago #1034

TVJim wrote:
I always like to point out the fact that every new song you sing is like a new crossword puzzle and that you have to solve all the problems in it.

The first thing that needs to be done is to vocalize to vocal exercises to create some flexibility and balance in the voice. No matter what song you sing if those problems are not solved the song won't be up to par.

So it is my suggestion that you go through the beginning and intermediate course information on a very regular basis. There are many places on the site where I explain the fact that we have 2 tendons in our vocal cords and those tendons must be stretched for your voice to gain flexibility.

They cannot be stretched during normal speech but only through utilizing the types of exercises that I've included in the courses.

This is something that most beginners really don't understand and that is
getting the flexibility in the vocal cords and getting the right amount of air pressure up underneath the vocal cords as you vocalize will have a cause and effects throughout everything that you sing.

What I always do with a new student when I walk into my studio is at 1st just play some random notes on the piano and ask the student to sing them just to find out if they can even match their pitch to the notes.

It doesn't really matter if they can or can not find the note . If they're having trouble finding the note I'll have them sing a note and I'll find their note this is all about evaluation.

I moved right from there to having them vocalize on a 5 note major scale pattern. Meaning the first 5 notes of the scale major scale (12345 or do re mi fa so).

I always have them vocalize on the Ah vowel sound not because I feel that's the best sound for them to advance their voice and exercises with but because that's actually a harder sound to sing correctly.

Actually I never ever train anybody on a Ah vowel sound in the beginning exercises . I only use it for evaluation.

Now of course you're not here in my studio for me to do that with that is why I have put the exercises down in such a logical manner that regardless of what the evaluation turns out to be if you follow the exercises in chronological order your voice will start to improve.

At 1st you may not notice anything and everybody's very judgmental about their own voices in what they expect to happen quickly. That is another point I want to make please do not be judgmental of your voice in the beginning just believe that you will be getting better as you vocalize and continue to enjoy the process. It will get better, I'm saying it again for a fact it will get better.

So it takes a little patience and Tenacity to do these exercises as it does any other set of exercises for any other reason to improve the strength of your body.

Everybody knows if they do enough setups push-ups curls that there will be a cause-and-effect and they'll see it in their body. But not the 1st day of course. Vocal exercises of the same.

Also these exercises are physical and like any physical exercises it takes time.

Also, the extra added thing is the ear training and air balancing that is also required of a vocalist. I'm saying that the physical and the thought mind connection must be brought together in a logical way. Again thought out in the exercises.

As far as singing with or without music my answer is to do both. A cappella singing without having to match up to the pitch of the chord changes is of benefit. Singing the chord changes and getting your voice to match the correct melody line within the chord changes is also of extreme benefit.


As far as songs are concerned I always like to get a beginning singer to sing a song that is very easy, meaning not too challenging in the range, not too challenging in the notes moving too fast, not too challenging in notes jumping up and down in wide intervals.

This doesn't mean you have to sing Mary had a Little Lamb but just songs that you're feeling pretty comfortable with, in the beginning it's more important to work a little bit more on preciseness than the extremes that everybody wants to be able to handle in the harder songs.

Also, the way I've structured things on the site all the exercises in the courses can be parts to be related to when you're actually learning a song.

When I do song breakdowns I always include exercises to help you get your voice in the proper position for that particular song and also discuss the vowel consonant and pronunciation concepts of the lyrics.All of these exercises can be found in the courses.

Also song choices are very different for the Male and female voice because of where their range fall’s.

If you were to choose Beatles songs you'd actually be better off to choose songs that Ringo and George sang over the songs that John and Paul were singing. Obviously John and Paul were much more advanced singers.

Don't get me wrong George had the same some really weird harmony parts and had to have an amazing ear to do that when he was singing harmony in the group.

But his solo material and Ringo's solo material are flat-out easier in range and technique.

Also learning some of the older ballad singers (even if it may seem boring and not your style) at all are still great learning tools.

So even Frank Sinatra songs Dean Martin and Tony Bennett could be of great value to you. Most of those singers I just mentioned never go into their head voice at all but stay in chest to mix.

Much different than trying to sing Eagles tunes in the beginning because they really sang from chest mix and head voice constantly.

Same holds true for heavier rockers like Led Zeppelin tunes the technique has to be stronger before we move into songs like.

It's kind of interesting but it's almost like the history of American singing progresses through the decades from an easier approach to a harder approach.

Meaning it's easier to sing 30s and 40s ballads even 50s

than is the singing 60s 70s 80s and on up till today because in those time periods the singers sang higher into their head voices.

Definitely there are some songs in the 50s that fall right in line with the Sinatra era as well. Although even in the 50s you'll find a lot more use of head voice.

Probably more information than you expected but just to give you a little overview to help you on your journey.

Keep singing,
TV Jim


I appreciate this one. Thanks...
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